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Get WonderCon Coverage & Save 50% on Graphic Novels at Booth #421

March 30th, 2011 Comments off

WonderCon 2011
WonderCon is April 1 through 3, and Things From Another World will be there! Make sure to stop by Booth #421 to say hi and save 50% on thousands of graphic novels. We combed through our inventory and handpicked tons of graphic novels from Marvel, Dark Horse, DC Comics, Image, and more–you’ll definitely find a bagful of things to add to your collection.

We’ll also have select new Dark Horse Comics graphic novels–like Axe Cop, The Guild, and The Amazing Screw-On Head and Other Curious Objects–at cover price. However, let us let you in on a little secret: if you visit the Dark Horse Comics booth (also Booth #421), you’ll get a coupon for 10% off!

Plus, we’re bringing statues, toys, collectibles, and more, and offering them at incredible savings.

Can’t make it to WonderCon this year? Stay tuned to The Blog From Another World for video coverage! We’ll be covering the panels and interviewing the creators you’ll want to know about, add us to your RSS feed or subscribe to us on YouTube, Twitter, or Facebook for updates.

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What do you want us to cover at WonderCon? Post your suggestions below, and we’ll try to get it for you!

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TFAW Hosts Drink & Draw Like a Lady: West April 15

March 28th, 2011 Comments off

Girl ComicsDrink & Draw Like a Lady returns to Portland for a second year Friday, April 15 at the Hollywood Things From Another World TFAW at 4133 NE Sandy Blvd., Portland, OR from 8:00 p.m. to midnight.

This is a very special women-only event! All ladies–whether they create comics, love comics, or just want to learn more about them–are invited to take part in some female positivity, as well as complimentary hors de’oeurves, beer, and wine (with valid I.D.).

Founded in 2009 by Hope Larson as a pre-event for MoCCA (a fundraiser for the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art) and organized this year by Lucy Knisley, Drink & Draw Like a Lady is an excellent opportunity for women to sketch, socialize with the local comics community, and network. Do you have minicomics and business cards to share? Bring ‘em! Are you new to comics and want to get the perspective of other females? This is the perfect event for you.

Periscope Studio artists Cat Farris and Natalie “Tally” Nourigat are spearheading the West Coast edition this year. “There are so many incredible female creators, editors, and fans of comics in Portland,” said Farris. “It’s the perfect place for an event like this–we were really happy about the energy it generated last year.”

“I grew up reading comics in the ’80s and ’90s,” said TFAW Marketing Manager Elisabeth Forsythe, “but there wasn’t really a female support system for me back then. I’m so happy there are so many women in comics today, and that TFAW can host an event of this stature.”

Come on down April 15 and get to know the women of comics! RSVP at the Facebook event. The Hollywood Things From Another World is conveniently located near TriMet’s Hollywood Transit Center: plan your trip online. Additional questions? Email Cat Farris.

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Lois Lane Cast in New Superman Movie: Meet Amy Adams

March 28th, 2011 Comments off

Amy Adams Is Lois LaneThe latest Superman movie casting news broke this weekend, and it was big: three-time Oscar nominee Amy Adams has been tapped to play headstrong reporter Lois Lane.

I’m extremely pleased about this for two reasons: one, Adams is a very good actress who has tackled everything from light comedy to gut-wrenching tragedy, and who has a gift for connecting with the audience. Two: she’s 36. I really like the idea of a Lois Lane who has been a career woman for many years and won her fame–and cynicism–in a believable timeframe. I’m really hoping that this means we’ll be seeing a substantial, well-rounded Lois Lane in Zach Snyder’s Superman, rather than a typical damsel in distress.

If you haven’t had the pleasure of getting to know Adams on the small and large screens, here are some recommendations to get you caught up before curtain time:

  • Junebug: Want to laugh and then get your heart ripped out? Ashley, Adams’ pregnant, small-town character, is at first portrayed as a figure of fun. The naive, eager Ashley is smitten with the idea of the big city and follows her sophisticated sister-in-law around like a puppy. But a major plot twist (no spoilers) near the end shows the heartbreaking steel behind Adams’ performance. Hopefully, Adams will bring this immense range to Lois.
  • The Office, Seasons 1 and 2 (“Hot Girl,” “The Fire,” “Booze Cruise”): As soon as Jim asks Katy, Adams’ purse-selling character, out on a date, we know she’s history. There’s no way she could have survived the Jim-and-Pam Undeclared Soultrain of Love–especially when she names Legally Blonde as the movie she’d take on a desert island. But although she’s revealed as a former cheerleader with mid-brow tastes, Adam plays her just right: a well-meaning, fun girl whose only major flaw is that she’s not Pam. Adams did a great job blending in with the cast and lent subtle hilarity to her horror at Michael clumsily asking her out. These talents should serve her well in an ensemble cast like Superman.
  • Enchanted: Giselle, Adams’ fish-out-of-water fairytale princess, would be a tricky role for anyone to pull off–it needs to be satirized without becoming, well, a cartoon. Adams’ pulls this off swimmingly, showing the growth her character experiences and taking what could be a cliche role and grounding it in reality.
  • The Fighter: Think Lois Lane needs plenty of grit? Your worries will be completely vanquished when you watch Adams as Charlene Fleming, a tough-as-nails bartender who doesn’t take any guff from anyone–not even Micky Ward’s terrifying sisters.

So what do you think of this casting news? Adams wasn’t even a choice in our Lois Lane poll back in January. Are you looking forward to the new Superman movie? Post your comments below.

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Keith R.A. DeCandido and Will Sliney Talk About Farscape Comics

March 28th, 2011 Comments off

With only a few short days left of BOOM! Month at TFAW, we’re breaking out the big guns and finishing it in style. We tracked down Farscape writer Keith R.A. DeCandido and artist Will Sliney for a frelling awesome interview and the accompanying Farscape Contest. Here’s how it all went down. –Warning, some spoilers below–

TFAW.com: What was it like, moving from writing the Farscape novels to the comics, Keith?

Keith R.A. DeCandido: Well, just in general, the transition from prose to comics has been fascinating. In prose, you’re a lone wolf–everything rides entirely upon the writer’s words. But in comics, you’re only part of the storytelling, with the art, the colors, the lettering all playing a big role. Plus the storytelling space is much more proscribed.

In a novel–even in a short story–you have a certain flexibility of length. But in a comic book, you have to tell the story in 22 pages–no more, no less. That presents all kinds of challenges, as it dictates the pacing and forces you to boil the story down to its essence and its most important elements.

TFAW.com: As with many sci-fi shows, Farscape has a dense history in terms of plot and lots of regular and recurring characters. What do you focus on, when fleshing out new stories?

KRAD: Depends on the needs of that particular story. Farscape is a sufficiently broad franchise in the types of stories that can be told and in the sheer volume of interesting characters that the focus changes depending on the needs of the story.

TFAW.com: What’s the creative process like between you and Rockne O’Bannon? How involved is he now?

KRAD: Up until the current “The War for the Uncharted Territories” storyline, the process was as follows: Rockne wrote a very detailed plot of each four-issue arc–usually about 20 pages of a PDF–then I’d write a page-by-page breakdown, which might add some details. Rockne and I would go over that, and then I’d write the script, which would go to Rockne, and he’d then give me notes on the script.

That changed with “TWftUT” arc because Rockne’s situation changed: he became Supervising Producer on the new V television series, and suddenly he no longer had the time to go over so many specifics with me. But Rockne also–very generously–trusts me with the characters, especially after two years of working together, so he wrote an overview of the 12-issue storyline (one that was about as detailed as the four-issue arcs of the past), leaving me to fill in the blanks of the plot and write the scripts. That’s why I have a co-plotting credit on this particular storyline. The broad strokes are Rockne’s, as are some of the details, and the remaining details and the script are mine.

But Rockne and the Jim Henson Company have final say over everything.

TFAW.com: How much influence do you have on how the stories develop?

KRAD: I’ve had more as time goes on. And sometimes I’ll make a suggestion that Rockne will like. As an example, it was my idea to bring Sikozu back. Rockne wanted to bring back Grunchlk, and since he was last seen with Sikozu in The Peacekeeper Wars, it seemed a natural that she be there too. And he liked the dynamic she added to the storyline.

Preview of Farscape #17

Farscape #17 page 1 preview

TFAW.com: Will, has KRAD been pretty hands-on, or have you been given a lot of freedom to leave your mark on the franchise?

Will Sliney: I’m lucky to have gotten to know KRAD as the series went on. He definitely knows how to write for artists, and at the right time every once in a while I get a note telling me to go crazy on a page, which of course I like. The guy loves Farscape, and if there ever is any specific direction from him on how to do something, then it’s going to be the right way to handle it.

TFAW.com: Will, you have a lot of Farscape issues under your belt, what have been your favorite moments in the series so far?

WS: I have a few. Getting to draw the crew on the bridge of Moya for the first time was a special moment for me. Aeryn taking over the Peacekeepers is probably my favourite story moment. I read the plot and got real excited when I knew that moment was coming up, because it’s such a profound moment in Farscape history. As for fun moments, that’s gotta be issue #17 of the ongoing, which stars just Rygel and Scorpius. I love those two guys.

TFAW.com: Keith, you’ve been writing Farscape comics for years now–what has changed in that time for you, as a comics writer?

KRAD: I think I’ve gotten more comfortable with the medium. I recently re-read my first comics work, which was way back in 1999–a Star Trek: The Next Generation comic book for WildStorm–and it was painfully awkward. After doing this for almost three years, and with more than 40 Farscape comics under my belt, I’ve settled into a nice rhythm. I think the issues are better paced now and I have a much better sense of what the medium can do and how to write properly within the form. Those old Trek comics read way too much like a prose writer trying comics for the first time . . .

Preview of Farscape #17

Farscape #17 page 2 preview

TFAW.com: Were you a fan of the TV show before you started working on the comic, Will?

WS: Yep, absolutely. I watched Farscape back when I was in college. My roommate was a huge sci-fi fan and converted me onto it. I had seen a lot of it on the BBC, but that was the first time I got to watch it chronologically. I was just about caught up before the Peacekeepers war hit.

There is a line in the DVD of the movie which I distinctly remember, where someone at Jim Henson mentions that they hoped Farscape continued in some form some day, so it was great as a fan to be part of that continuation.

TFAW.com: Keith, there have been some huge changes to the Farscape universe under your pen: Aeryn is now the Commandant of the Peacekeepers, and characters like Kirlix and Sikozu are dead. What have been some of the most controversial developments, in your mind?

KRAD: Well, besides Aeryn becoming leader of the people who kicked her out, and away from whom she thrived, I’d say the most controversial is having Chiana get together with a killer who’s going after Crichton and Aeryn’s son.

TFAW.com: How did you come to work on Farscape, Will?

WS: BOOM! pretty much plucked me from European comics. I had a trial for another series, and thankfully they chose me for this one instead, as it has gotten quite a healthy run.

TFAW.com: Keith, when we interviewed you at SDCC last year, you had a fan come up who was pretty fired up. Does it surprise you how invested fans are in your work?

Preview of Farscape #17

Farscape #17 page 3 preview

KRAD: No, because I was part of Farscape fandom long before I became involved professionally. I used to post on the old Sci-Fi Channel Boards on their Dominion website back in the mists of prehistory, when dinosaurs roamed the earth and “wireless” was what people used to call radios in the early 20th century.

I still participate in the discussions on the boards that continue to talk about Farscape to this day. I know exactly how passionate the fans are, because I’m one of them. It’s why a comic book based on a TV show that had been off the air for half a decade has been a success.

TFAW.com: Do you have any fan stories, Will?

WS: Yeah I do. I’d get to meet tons of fans at comic cons, and they all seem really happy that Farscape was brought back. Those are definitely the best moments. Some have even gone as far as to send me reference imagery of the Farscape props and original costumes that they own.

TFAW.com: So the events of Farscape: Scorpius have converged with the regular series, bringing the godlike, villianous Kkore to the Uncharted Territories. Were you excited to have Scorpius to play with?

KRAD: Amusingly, I was initially against having Scorpius even show up in the first miniseries. I got over that, though. I also wanted to have Rygel condemn him to a dungeon on Hyneria rather than exile him. But after reading what Rockne and my buddy David Alan Mack did with him in the Scorpius series, I was thrilled at the notion of getting him to write for.

A part of me thought that Scorpius’s story was more or less finished when the Command Carrier blew up at the end of the third season, and I was never entirely comfortable with having him on Moya in the fourth.

But the Kkore storyline has done a wonderful job of showcasing what makes Scorpius such a fantastic character, and he’s been a joy to write. In fact, my absolute favorite issue of any Farscape comic book to write to date has been issue #17 of the ongoing series, which is basically a Rygel and Scorpius road movie.

Preview of Farscape #17

Farscape #17 page 4 preview

TFAW.com: So far, the Kkore seem unstoppable: they have the technology, the will, and the intelligence to do whatever they wish. Even Scorpius feels they might be his superiors. What is the point of pitting our heroes against an omnipotent force? How can they possibly succeed?

KRAD: You’ll just have to keep reading . . .

TFAW.com: It seems that Scorpius doesn’t always agree with the Kkore’s directives–such as destroying peaceful planets–but so far he’s fine with carrying them out. Scorpius knows their power and capabilities, but I can’t picture him not trying to subvert them in the future–am I right?

KRAD: There’s a comment Scorpius makes: “Reflected glory is no glory at all.” There’s only so long he’s going to serve an agenda that isn’t his own.

TFAW.com: Sikozu underwent such a journey, as a character. She sacrificed everything for her people, was shunned because of it, and just as she was finding her feet again, she discovers that her people are dead, then sacrifices herself for the greater good. When was this decided, and why did she have to die?

KRAD: Rockne, our editor Ian Brill, and I all agreed from the outset that this storyline had to have consequences, that characters we knew and cared about had to die in order for this to be effective as a story in the Farscape universe. Trust me, Sikozu’s not the last death we’re going to see . . .

TFAW.com: We’ve received some answers as to how Deke’s mutation occurred–systematic poisoning of the Peacekeepers’ food supply–but does that mean that there are other children out there who share it? Can they also affect time?

KRAD: Yes and we don’t know. Yet.

TFAW.com: Speaking of PK children, Commandant Cleavage (Grayza) and her child have been exiled, much as Aeryn was. When will we see them again?

KRAD: Good question . . .

TFAW.com: Deke is still an infant in the comics. Will he experience any rapid aging, as many kids on TV shows do, to move his story forward?

KRAD: I see no reason to. Honestly, there are plenty of ways to tell Deke’s story without the artificial aging. Besides, right now we’re still in the “past,” as it were, since the comics take place in the first couple of years after PKW, which took place in (roughly) 2003-2004 or so. So all we have to do to age Deke is to jump ahead a few years into the actual present of the second decade of the 21st century . . .

TFAW.com: All in all, we’ve only read the first part of The War for the Uncharted Territories, which will be a 12-part series. Can you tell give us any hints of what’s ahead?

KRAD: Lots more death and destruction. Actions having consequences. Rygel and Scorpius together again. And copious uses of the word “frell.”

Preview of Farscape #17

Farscape #17 page 5 preview

TFAW.com: Do you have a favorite character to draw, Will?

WS: Well, it used to be Crichton, but as the series went on, and because it was a long long time before he came into the ongoing, Scorpius is definitely my favourite.

TFAW.com: I’m really tickled by Scorpius’s lizard friend, “John.” Is there any significance to his name? Also, could you please assure me that nothing bad will happen to him?

KRAD: It was Dave Mack’s idea to name him John, and why not? After all, nobody has been a bigger force in Scorpius’s life the past couple of cycles than John Crichton, and while Scorpius isn’t renowned for his sense of humor, he does have one, and I think he derives some satisfaction from naming a helpless creature that he rescued from a frigid wasteland after Crichton.

And I have no plans to do anything to John, though he will go through quite a bit in issue #17 . . .

TFAW.com: In “Gone and Back,” in an alternate timeline, John Crichton and Scorpius are friends. What do you think it would take for them to be friends in the original timeline? Is that even a possibility?

KRAD: I don’t see any way for them to be friends in the mainline timeline because their relationship started with Scorpius torturing Crichton for, y’know, a while. And there’s likely never going to be a circumstance under which Scorpius will ever regret that particular action, nor the many reprehensible actions he’s taken since then (killing a bunch of Banik slaves just to get at Jothee, leaving Crichton with his brain exposed and his language center frelled, threatening Deke).

It’s possible that some day, Crichton might consider the possibility of forgiving Scorpius, but that’ll be a very very long time from the present, and that still doesn’t mean he’d be willing to befriend him.

(Scorpius and Crichton are friends in the “Gone and Back” timeline because they didn’t meet on the Gammak Base. They only went there to save Aeryn, after all. Scorpius never tortured Crichton, and they encountered each other later on in the timeline.)

TFAW.com: What are you most looking forward to in the Farscape universe?

KRAD: The fan reaction to issue #17, which is the Rygel-Scorpius road movie I was telling you about . . .

TFAW.com: What other BOOM! books are you digging right now, Will?

WS: All the books from the Irredeemable universe are pure gold, and I was delighted to see that their Stan Lee superhero books are great too. 28 Days Later is great too, but my favourites are the Mark Waid books.

Will's Scorpius Sketch

Win this Scorpius sketch by Will Sliney

We’re psyched that Will offered up this sketch of Scorpius for our Farscape Contest. All you gotta do to enter is post your favorite Farscape moment (from the comic or the TV show) by March 31, 2011. For complete rules and alternate entry methods, please visit the Farscape Contest page.

What has your favorite Farscape moment been? Post your comments below to enter to win this sketch!

FIND OUT HOW TO WIN THE FARSCAPE SKETCH BY WILL SLINEY

SEE ALL THE HOTTEST FARSCAPE PRODUCTS AT TFAW

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Chew Comics Coming to Showtime?

March 25th, 2011 Comments off

Tony & MasonIt sounds like we may have a little more of John Layman and Rob Guillory’s Chew to look forward to in our future! According to Deadline Hollywood, Showtime has purchased a script written by Terri Hughes Burton and Ron Milbauer (Eureka).

Stephen Hopkins (24, Californication, Shameless) is attached to direct and executive produce the 30-minute show from Circle of Confusion, the production company behind AMC’s The Walking Dead.

I’m excited that Showtime may be the new home of our favorite cibopathic FDA agent Tony Chu. I think could be a really good fit. I count myself among the many who hope that the stars align so we can see Ken Leung in the lead role.

What do you think of the news? Are you optimistic about the small-screen adaptation? Who would you like to see play Tony? How about Amelia and Savoy? Post your thoughts below.

SEE ALL UPCOMING CHEW COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS

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Christopher Monfette Talks About New Hellraiser Comics

March 23rd, 2011 Comments off

BOOM! Month presses forward today, and we’ve got something very special for you horror fans out there! We’ve got an exclusive interview with Christopher Monfette, who’s teamed with Clive Barker to pen the new Hellraiser comic book series, which kicks off with today’s release of issue #1. Throughout the interview, you’ll find preview pages from the first issue, so be sure to check those out in greater detail by clicking on each image.

I got the chance to read an advanced preview of the first issue, and I was completely blown away. The whole team knocked it out of the park. I couldn’t be more excited for the story that Barker and Monfette have set up, and Leonardo Manco delivers stunning visuals.

Before you dig into Monfette’s interview, you’ll want to check out the link below. We’ve got access to an original eight-page Hellraiser story that serves as a prelude to the first issue of the series. It’ll put you in a good place to read the interview.

Now, on to the main event. Warning, some readers might find the images below disturbing. Not recommended for younger readers.

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 1

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 1

TFAW.com: Can you tell us a little about the new Hellraiser comic book series?

Christopher Monfette: Despite all that’s come before–the films, the comics, etc.–this series is the true continuation of Clive’s vision as he presented it 25 years ago. This Pinhead is Doug Bradley’s Pinhead; this world is the world of Kirsty Cotton, of the Channard Institute. Our canon is simple: The Hellbound Heart, Hellraiser, and Hellraiser II.

The story finds Pinhead at the height of his melancholy. He’s murdered the masses; he’s solved the riddles of the flesh. And because he secretly clings to the ambitions of his former humanity, he constructs a plan to claw his way up out of Hell.

He makes a literal deal with the Devil. But that notion requires the unwilling participation of Kirsty Cotton, who’s been busy battling against the Lament Devices alongside the Harrowers since we last saw her in Hellbound. Thus begins a very deadly game of chess as these two characters spiral toward each other . . .

TFAW.com: So the Harrowers play a pivotal role in the series?

CM: The Harrowers do, indeed, make an appearance in this series, but not necessarily in the same incarnation as we’ve seen them in past comics. This is a more grounded, realistic ensemble–a group of men and women working together to track down and destroy LeMarchand’s devices. Who they are, and where they’ve come from–not necessarily as comic book heroes, but as damaged human beings–all plugs directly back into Kirsty’s story, Kirsty’s experience. The human toll. So in that sense, we’re using the word “Harrower” as a general term; Hunters of Hell, so to speak. Readers will learn much, much more about them in issue #3.

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 2

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 2

TFAW.com: How did Leonardo Manco come to work on the series?

CM: Manco’s work had caught Clive’s eye somewhere along the way, and I can only imagine that it was his gritty, stark, brilliantly illustrated realism that made him perfect for the series. My own experience with Manco as writer–and–artist has been a revelation.

Working with an artist for the first time, you can never be certain whether your visions of the world will be the same, or the degree to which they might pluck a description from the page, an imagined image from your head, and make it rise above.

Fortunately, Manco’s work has elevated my own and opened up possibilities for me as a writer because of his jaw-dropping ability to communicate these increasingly bizarre and twisted visuals on the page. But that he can do so in a way that makes them feel like they’re appearing in a real world–our world–is what makes him the only choice for this series.

TFAW.com: What’s been your favorite part about working on the comic so far? Have you been a fan of the Hellraiser series for awhile?

CM: Long before I ever met Clive–and decades before I got this gig–I grew up with Hellraiser. Of all the horror icons that popped up in the early ’80s, Pinhead was the one figurehead that really spoke to me as a younger, emerging genre fan.

The design, the mythology; there was a sense of something new, something deeper and more interesting than wholesale slasher villains. And a sizeable part of that–aside from Clive’s contribution as a visionary–was Doug Bradley’s portrayal. The voice he brought to the character, deep and resonating. Moreso than having the opportunity to craft and sustain a Hellraiser narrative, there’s a childish glee I find in scripting Pinhead’s poetic eloquence and passing it through the filter of Doug’s voice.

If I can’t imagine how Doug would deliver a particular line, I’ll likely change it, and since this story happens within the cinematic world that Clive created, that seems like a both a fitting and necessary tribute.

TFAW.com: What have been the biggest challenges?

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 3

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 3

CM: The process has been surprisingly organic, but it’s never an easy task to sustain horror within a serialized format. These aren’t simply one-off issues, after all, but rather one continuing narrative, and that comes with a unique set of demands.

Granted, this is Hellraiser, so it might have been easy to simply toss a few odd visuals and a metric ton of gore onto the page and call it a day, but everything in this series stems first from character. Pinhead, Kirsty, the Harrowers–each of these figures have their own motivations, their own melancholies, their own fears. Demons, literal and figurative. And we, as creators, have a responsibility to deliver our trademark horror alongside actual characters and challenging ideas.

You do a disservice to the genre when you downplay drama in favor of two-dimensional bloodshed. So delivering upon the demands of terror while offering up substantive characters–with the potential to actually move the reader–all while threading one main story through eight issues–which each must offer something new, something terrifying–is no easy feat . . .

TFAW.com: Why did you decide to bring Kirsty back?

CM: In a sense, the series is really a torch-passing, a transition from the Hellraiser that Clive created 25 years ago into a completely new vision of Hell.

By the time you really get into the series, the themes, the characters, the aesthetic are going to be very, very different from where they first started, but you can’t make that kind of transformation lightly, or abruptly. We’re not rebooting the series; we’re evolving it. And in creating something that would invite new readers into the Hellraiser mythology, it felt somehow appropriate to begin in a place familiar to the fans who’ve been there all along. A mid-point between one circle of Hell and another.

Consequently, it never seemed to me that Kirsty’s story was complete, and since we were only using The Hellbound Heart and the first two films as our canon–and since we were embracing the actual time that had passed–and since we were exploring Pinhead’s personal melancholy, his desire for a challenge–it seemed fascinating to bring back the one character who’d bested him, to explore the effects that wearing your stepmother’s skin, or falling face-first into to the flayed corpse of your father, or battling demons in Hell, might have had on Kirsty over the years.

TFAW.com: How did you come to work on the project?

CM: Clive and I have known each other for about six years, and I’ve scripted feature adaptations of two of his short stories for his production company: “Down, Satan” and “Son of Celluloid.”

In 2009, we collaborated on a beautifully strange–or strangely beautiful–comic for IDW called Seduth, a surrealistic 3D horror one-off. So when the opportunity came to resurrect Pinhead–Clive’s Pinhead, the ever-real and only Pinhead–on the illustrated page, I got the phone call to come aboard. And that Clive would trust me with this iconic character, and allow me such sprawling, creative space to shape the series, is absolutely an honor.

TFAW.com: What is it like working with Clive Barker on his beloved story?

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 4

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 4

CM: Clive is a fantastic collaborator not only in that his impulses are furiously creative, but in that he truly listens. Clive’s original thoughts for this series were wildly different from what you’ll see on the page, and when I offered up my own–about Kirsty, about the eventual endgame–he took them in, considered them, and together we developed an arc that combined themes and images and narrative elements that were important to both of us.

As creator and fan, he’s exceptionally generous and uniquely open to the creative, collaborative process. The ideas that go into the mind-factory don’t exclusively have to be his own, but what comes out the other side will certainly have his artistic fingerprints. As I deliver these scripts, he’ll come back with minor notes, with sketches, that push the weirdness a bit further, that heighten the horror, that challenge the expectations of the reader.

TFAW.com: Were you worried about joining the franchise?

CM: Not at all. Largely because I wasn’t going in blind. In fact, I was fully armed with 25 years of ideas and a long, abiding admiration for the series. I knew from having worked with Clive in the past that I’d have a voice in the process. It’s certainly intimidating for a creator to say, “What would you do with my creation?” but the opportunity to shape the fate of an icon isn’t one that allows for much fear. And between Clive and the folks at BOOM!, the landscape was one of confidence and creativity.

TFAW.com: What characters/elements have you brought to the story? Have any of them wowed Clive?

CM: Certainly, the collaborative process is organic, but I felt passionately from the beginning that Kirsty needed to be a driving force behind the series. And having watched Pinhead be cinematically abused for nearly two decades on-screen, it felt to me that the tiredness of the character deserved exploration, as well.

Those two things suggested a story in which Pinhead, having solved the mystery of the flesh–bored with the tortures of Hell, half-remembering his own discarded humanity–must manipulate the puzzle box back into the life of the woman who once escaped him. Not simply to service the diehard fans, but to be the catalyst for a massive transformation that would offer Clive a new Hell to imagine; BOOM! a fresh vision, a continuing series; and readers a little bit of something familiar before charting an entirely new territory. Clive really responded to that creative challenge and offered up particular themes, suggested the Harrowers, etc . . .

TFAW.com: How would you describe the comic to a new reader? Who’s going to dig this series? What kind of reader are you looking to hook (no pun intended)?

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 5

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 5

CM: How does one describe Hellraiser? That seems like an impossible task! But this series is a character-driven horror tale of tremendous scope that serves as a mid-way point for both new fans and old.

New readers will meet Kirsty and Pinhead at a pivotal time of change–as if they were new characters with a mysterious, unspoken past–launching them both into an entirely original vision of Hell. Long-time fans, however, will watch these aging nemeses–with so much history between them–expand into a much deeper, more complex mythology than Hellraiser has ever explored. And make no mistake, if this series is successful, this will mark the beginning of a much larger, much stranger, much more terrifying story.

We want to thank Christopher Monfette for taking the time out of his busy schedule to chat with us about Hellraiser.

We hope you’re as excited about this series as we are. This first issue definitely delivered. What did you think about the prelude and preview pages you saw here? We want to hear what you have to say–post your comments below.

READ BOOM! MONTH INTERVIEWS & MORE

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Christopher Monfette Talks About New Hellraiser Comics

March 23rd, 2011 Comments off

BOOM! Month presses forward today, and we’ve got something very special for you horror fans out there! We’ve got an exclusive interview with Christopher Monfette, who’s teamed with Clive Barker to pen the new Hellraiser comic book series, which kicks off with today’s release of issue #1. Throughout the interview, you’ll find preview pages from the first issue, so be sure to check those out in greater detail by clicking on each image.

I got the chance to read an advanced preview of the first issue, and I was completely blown away. The whole team knocked it out of the park. I couldn’t be more excited for the story that Barker and Monfette have set up, and Leonardo Manco delivers stunning visuals.

Before you dig into Monfette’s interview, you’ll want to check out the link below. We’ve got access to an original eight-page Hellraiser story that serves as a prelude to the first issue of the series. It’ll put you in a good place to read the interview.

Now, on to the main event. Warning, some readers might find the images below disturbing. Not recommended for younger readers.

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 1

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 1

TFAW.com: Can you tell us a little about the new Hellraiser comic book series?

Christopher Monfette: Despite all that’s come before–the films, the comics, etc.–this series is the true continuation of Clive’s vision as he presented it 25 years ago. This Pinhead is Doug Bradley’s Pinhead; this world is the world of Kirsty Cotton, of the Channard Institute. Our canon is simple: The Hellbound Heart, Hellraiser, and Hellraiser II.

The story finds Pinhead at the height of his melancholy. He’s murdered the masses; he’s solved the riddles of the flesh. And because he secretly clings to the ambitions of his former humanity, he constructs a plan to claw his way up out of Hell.

He makes a literal deal with the Devil. But that notion requires the unwilling participation of Kirsty Cotton, who’s been busy battling against the Lament Devices alongside the Harrowers since we last saw her in Hellbound. Thus begins a very deadly game of chess as these two characters spiral toward each other . . .

TFAW.com: So the Harrowers play a pivotal role in the series?

CM: The Harrowers do, indeed, make an appearance in this series, but not necessarily in the same incarnation as we’ve seen them in past comics. This is a more grounded, realistic ensemble–a group of men and women working together to track down and destroy LeMarchand’s devices. Who they are, and where they’ve come from–not necessarily as comic book heroes, but as damaged human beings–all plugs directly back into Kirsty’s story, Kirsty’s experience. The human toll. So in that sense, we’re using the word “Harrower” as a general term; Hunters of Hell, so to speak. Readers will learn much, much more about them in issue #3.

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 2

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 2

TFAW.com: How did Leonardo Manco come to work on the series?

CM: Manco’s work had caught Clive’s eye somewhere along the way, and I can only imagine that it was his gritty, stark, brilliantly illustrated realism that made him perfect for the series. My own experience with Manco as writer–and–artist has been a revelation.

Working with an artist for the first time, you can never be certain whether your visions of the world will be the same, or the degree to which they might pluck a description from the page, an imagined image from your head, and make it rise above.

Fortunately, Manco’s work has elevated my own and opened up possibilities for me as a writer because of his jaw-dropping ability to communicate these increasingly bizarre and twisted visuals on the page. But that he can do so in a way that makes them feel like they’re appearing in a real world–our world–is what makes him the only choice for this series.

TFAW.com: What’s been your favorite part about working on the comic so far? Have you been a fan of the Hellraiser series for awhile?

CM: Long before I ever met Clive–and decades before I got this gig–I grew up with Hellraiser. Of all the horror icons that popped up in the early ’80s, Pinhead was the one figurehead that really spoke to me as a younger, emerging genre fan.

The design, the mythology; there was a sense of something new, something deeper and more interesting than wholesale slasher villains. And a sizeable part of that–aside from Clive’s contribution as a visionary–was Doug Bradley’s portrayal. The voice he brought to the character, deep and resonating. Moreso than having the opportunity to craft and sustain a Hellraiser narrative, there’s a childish glee I find in scripting Pinhead’s poetic eloquence and passing it through the filter of Doug’s voice.

If I can’t imagine how Doug would deliver a particular line, I’ll likely change it, and since this story happens within the cinematic world that Clive created, that seems like a both a fitting and necessary tribute.

TFAW.com: What have been the biggest challenges?

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 3

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 3

CM: The process has been surprisingly organic, but it’s never an easy task to sustain horror within a serialized format. These aren’t simply one-off issues, after all, but rather one continuing narrative, and that comes with a unique set of demands.

Granted, this is Hellraiser, so it might have been easy to simply toss a few odd visuals and a metric ton of gore onto the page and call it a day, but everything in this series stems first from character. Pinhead, Kirsty, the Harrowers–each of these figures have their own motivations, their own melancholies, their own fears. Demons, literal and figurative. And we, as creators, have a responsibility to deliver our trademark horror alongside actual characters and challenging ideas.

You do a disservice to the genre when you downplay drama in favor of two-dimensional bloodshed. So delivering upon the demands of terror while offering up substantive characters–with the potential to actually move the reader–all while threading one main story through eight issues–which each must offer something new, something terrifying–is no easy feat . . .

TFAW.com: Why did you decide to bring Kirsty back?

CM: In a sense, the series is really a torch-passing, a transition from the Hellraiser that Clive created 25 years ago into a completely new vision of Hell.

By the time you really get into the series, the themes, the characters, the aesthetic are going to be very, very different from where they first started, but you can’t make that kind of transformation lightly, or abruptly. We’re not rebooting the series; we’re evolving it. And in creating something that would invite new readers into the Hellraiser mythology, it felt somehow appropriate to begin in a place familiar to the fans who’ve been there all along. A mid-point between one circle of Hell and another.

Consequently, it never seemed to me that Kirsty’s story was complete, and since we were only using The Hellbound Heart and the first two films as our canon–and since we were embracing the actual time that had passed–and since we were exploring Pinhead’s personal melancholy, his desire for a challenge–it seemed fascinating to bring back the one character who’d bested him, to explore the effects that wearing your stepmother’s skin, or falling face-first into to the flayed corpse of your father, or battling demons in Hell, might have had on Kirsty over the years.

TFAW.com: How did you come to work on the project?

CM: Clive and I have known each other for about six years, and I’ve scripted feature adaptations of two of his short stories for his production company: “Down, Satan” and “Son of Celluloid.”

In 2009, we collaborated on a beautifully strange–or strangely beautiful–comic for IDW called Seduth, a surrealistic 3D horror one-off. So when the opportunity came to resurrect Pinhead–Clive’s Pinhead, the ever-real and only Pinhead–on the illustrated page, I got the phone call to come aboard. And that Clive would trust me with this iconic character, and allow me such sprawling, creative space to shape the series, is absolutely an honor.

TFAW.com: What is it like working with Clive Barker on his beloved story?

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 4

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 4

CM: Clive is a fantastic collaborator not only in that his impulses are furiously creative, but in that he truly listens. Clive’s original thoughts for this series were wildly different from what you’ll see on the page, and when I offered up my own–about Kirsty, about the eventual endgame–he took them in, considered them, and together we developed an arc that combined themes and images and narrative elements that were important to both of us.

As creator and fan, he’s exceptionally generous and uniquely open to the creative, collaborative process. The ideas that go into the mind-factory don’t exclusively have to be his own, but what comes out the other side will certainly have his artistic fingerprints. As I deliver these scripts, he’ll come back with minor notes, with sketches, that push the weirdness a bit further, that heighten the horror, that challenge the expectations of the reader.

TFAW.com: Were you worried about joining the franchise?

CM: Not at all. Largely because I wasn’t going in blind. In fact, I was fully armed with 25 years of ideas and a long, abiding admiration for the series. I knew from having worked with Clive in the past that I’d have a voice in the process. It’s certainly intimidating for a creator to say, “What would you do with my creation?” but the opportunity to shape the fate of an icon isn’t one that allows for much fear. And between Clive and the folks at BOOM!, the landscape was one of confidence and creativity.

TFAW.com: What characters/elements have you brought to the story? Have any of them wowed Clive?

CM: Certainly, the collaborative process is organic, but I felt passionately from the beginning that Kirsty needed to be a driving force behind the series. And having watched Pinhead be cinematically abused for nearly two decades on-screen, it felt to me that the tiredness of the character deserved exploration, as well.

Those two things suggested a story in which Pinhead, having solved the mystery of the flesh–bored with the tortures of Hell, half-remembering his own discarded humanity–must manipulate the puzzle box back into the life of the woman who once escaped him. Not simply to service the diehard fans, but to be the catalyst for a massive transformation that would offer Clive a new Hell to imagine; BOOM! a fresh vision, a continuing series; and readers a little bit of something familiar before charting an entirely new territory. Clive really responded to that creative challenge and offered up particular themes, suggested the Harrowers, etc . . .

TFAW.com: How would you describe the comic to a new reader? Who’s going to dig this series? What kind of reader are you looking to hook (no pun intended)?

Hellraiser #1 Preview Page 5

Hellraiser #1 Preview pg. 5

CM: How does one describe Hellraiser? That seems like an impossible task! But this series is a character-driven horror tale of tremendous scope that serves as a mid-way point for both new fans and old.

New readers will meet Kirsty and Pinhead at a pivotal time of change–as if they were new characters with a mysterious, unspoken past–launching them both into an entirely original vision of Hell. Long-time fans, however, will watch these aging nemeses–with so much history between them–expand into a much deeper, more complex mythology than Hellraiser has ever explored. And make no mistake, if this series is successful, this will mark the beginning of a much larger, much stranger, much more terrifying story.

We want to thank Christopher Monfette for taking the time out of his busy schedule to chat with us about Hellraiser.

We hope you’re as excited about this series as we are. This first issue definitely delivered. What did you think about the prelude and preview pages you saw here? We want to hear what you have to say–post your comments below.

READ BOOM! MONTH INTERVIEWS & MORE

VISIT OUR BOOM! MONTH PAGE

SEE ALL AVAILABLE HELLRAISER COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS

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28 Days Later Contest Winner Announced

March 23rd, 2011 Comments off

Last week, we launched our 28 Days Later Contest. We asked you to tell us your favorite moment from the 28 Days Later movies or comic book series, and you did not disappoint.

Now it’s time for us to follow up on our end of the bargain. We’re sending Ale Aragón’s original sketch of Selena (pictured here to the right) to Mike C. who commented on our blog. Here’s Mike’s favorite 28 Days Later moment:

My favorite moment is from issue #8 when Selena and her allies are on a catwalk and the infected are down below hoping to get ahold of them. The boy falls off but is momentarily protected by a fence. As the infected start to break the fence down Selena ties a jacket to a rail and lowers herself down. She saves the boy and they both climb back up to safety just in time as the infected break the fence down. This sequence is a testament to what a bad a** Selena is. She never hesitates. I love her character. I want someone like her on my side when the infection hits. Also, great tension and suspense in this sequence as well.

Thanks to everyone who entered. Stay tuned to the TFAW Blog next week for another awesome BOOM! Month contest!

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Dan Abnett & Andy Lanning Talk About Soldier Zero

March 21st, 2011 Comments off

We’ve got another exciting BOOM! Month interview for you today. Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning of Starborn took some time from writing the book to answer a few of our burning questions. Here’s how it all went down:

Warning: Some Spoilers Ahead…

TFAW.com: Hi gents, thanks for talking with us.

Dan & Andy (DnA): Hi!

TFAW.com: How did you get involved with Soldier Zero?

DnA: We were invited to come on board by BOOM! editorial, an invitation that we were delighted to accept.

TFAW.com: What’s Stan Lee’s involvement with the series at this point? What’s it like to work with him?

DnA: Stan looks at every we do and has complete oversight. That’s a little scary and intimidating because he’s, well, Stan Lee! His feedback and notes are amazing, though. It’s a real pleasure to get the feedback.

TFAW.com: The main character, Stewart, is a former soldier who has lost the use of his legs. How do you think that enhances the story?

DnA: It’s an interesting dynamic, and addresses a lot of issues. We’re working to find the most interesting and relevant places to take it.

TFAW.com: Stewart isn’t particularly bitter about losing the use of his legs–he’s more annoyed by the reactions of people around him, and the limitations of his environment. Is this going to be a continuing theme of the book?

DnA: Yes. Also, just because the suit “gives him his legs back,” there are other prices to pay. Stewart has to decide if it’s worth it, or if he’s content being where he is.

TFAW.com: You guys get to delve deeper into the Soldier Zero mythos. What do you have up your sleeves for the alien soldiers? Why is Soldier Zero on the run?

DnA: That story is really opening out now. There’s some very big and very alien surprises in store, and everything is heading for a major set of reveals by the end of the first year of issues.

TFAW.com: It seems like Stewart and Soldier have a more equitable relationship than Soldier Zero has has with past “hosts”–Stewart can resist him and take more control. Are you planning on exploring that a bit more?

DnA: Yes, again! In fact that’s the primary theme of the very important developments that happen in issues #7 and #8.

TFAW.com: In issue #4, James loses an arm. How is this going to affect his character, and his relationship with his brother?

DnA: Not in the way you might expect, actually. It could have, tragically, helped him to understand Stewart’s situation, but things get a lot more complicated than that.

TFAW.com: How is Kaylee going to figure into the story? For now, she seems like the traditional love interest-damsel in distress.

DnA: Actually, there are three strong female characters orbiting Stewart. None of them are going to fulfill “traditional” roles.

TFAW.com: What’s it like working with Javier Pina?

DnA: Javier’s great. He’s a total professional, he gets what we want, and he keeps giving us great images. Stuff in issue #8 we’ve just seen? Wow!

TFAW.com: This isn’t your first book with BOOM! Studios, is it, Dan? What’s it like working with the folks at BOOM!?

Abnett: They’re lovely, and I had so much fun last time I was happy to be invited back.

TFAW.com: Andy, this is the first book you’ve done with BOOM!, right? How does BOOM! compare to the other publishers you’ve worked with?

Lanning: BOOM! are great, we’ve been truly welcomed into the fold and are having some really exciting creative back and forths with Bryce (Carlson, Editor), which is producing some interesting ideas and storylines that will play out throughout the BOOMverse! More than that, it’s great fun too!

TFAW.com: What other BOOM! titles are you reading right now?

DnA: All of them, of course!

Thanks again for your time gents! Really excited to see what you have up your sleeves.

We want to thank Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning for taking the time out of their busy schedules to chat with us about Soldier Zero. What have you thought of Soldier Zero so far? Where do you think it’s going? We want to hear what you have to say–post your comments below.

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Learn All About the Suicide Girls From Artist Cameron Stewart

March 18th, 2011 Comments off

TFAW.com Interviews Cameron Stewart!

One of the best parts of ECCC in Seattle is that many creators squeeze in a visit to Portland afterward! That’s how we were lucky enough to interview artist Cameron Stewart, well-known for his work on Ed Brubaker’s Catwoman and Oni’s Apocalipstix. Here, he talks about working with Grant Morrison on Batman & Robin, his upcoming IDW series, Suicide Girls, and what he’d like to do next!

Cameron Stewart Suicide Girls

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We’d like to thank Cameron for taking the time to talk with us during his visit to Portland! What would you like to see him tackle next? Post your comments below!

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